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Becoming a Local Tourist

January 14, 2015

We're thrilled to share this post from our newest Island Expert, Deanne. She'll be telling us more about her beautiful home island in upcoming posts. Here's her first contribution...

 

I like to run away. A lot. I am known for my itchy feet and am a complete travel junkie. Usually this trait finds me wandering the streets of Paris, or catching a great show in Las Vegas.

I recently decided to start exploring my island home of Jamaica with the idea of “playing tourist” the way I have elsewhere in the world. However, before I could start implementing my plan of caving, surfing, and hiking my way across Jamaica, I contracted a lovely virus which swept the region and left me moving like an arthritic old woman.

(The author on Jamaica, sans the virus that laid her low.)

 

I refused to be thwarted and, armed with painkillers and a wrist brace or two, I jumped in my car and drove to Port Antonio on the eastern end of the island. I spent a day recovering in my friend's gorgeous villa atop a hill with a view that still takes my breath away each time I look out at the bay.

 

Soon enough I managed to make my way down to the beach below. This small slice of paradise is known as San San.

(Taking in the mesmerizing ocean)

 

Water like glass stretches out from a curved stretch of white sand beach which creates the bay, cupping tiny Monkey Island in its centre. (No…there are no monkeys present and I still have yet to uncover the reason they all disappeared.) Its real name is Pellew Island and it can be visited by a leisurely kayak excursion or reached out to from one of the villas close by if you are a strong swimmer.

(Unbelievably pristine ocean)

 

I spent the first few days having a good 'seabath' and letting the crystal clear sea heal me as only nature can, only leaving the beach when a sudden squall would roll into the bay. Even then, I would often move only to find some shelter and watch the play of the storm on the waters of the bay. Soon enough, the skies would clear and a rainbow was almost guaranteed.

(A serene rainbow after the rain)

 

I wrote. I cooked. I ate. I swam. I spoke to no one for 4 days. My only human interaction was a nod of greeting to the gentleman who maintains the beach. I had reached nirvana.

I did finally venture forth from my solo paradise, but that is another tale to tell.

 

Thanks, Deanne, for this terrific post! Looking forward to more wonderful pictures and stories from Jamaica. See her bio on our Island Experts page.

 

All photographs (c) Deanne Allgrove.

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